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The Politcal Page

 Lies or Untruths

(Un·truth - a lie or false statement)

President Trump exhibits classic signs of mental illness, including 'malignant narcissism,' shrinks say


 The time has come to say it: there is something psychologically wrong with the President.


The fuzzy outlines of President Trump's likely mental illness came into sharper focus this week: in two interviews with major networks, he revealed paranoia and delusion; he quadruple-downed on his fabrication that millions of people voted illegally, which demonstrated he is disconnected from reality itself; his petulant trade war with Mexico reveals that he values self-image even over national interest; his fixation with inaugural crowd size reveals a childish need for attention.


Partisans have been warning about Trump's craziness for months, but rhetoric from political opponents is easily dismissed; it's the water of the very swamp the President says he wants to drain.


But frightened by the President's hubris, narcissism, defensiveness, belief in untrue things, conspiratorial reflexiveness and attacks on opponents, mental health professionals are finally speaking out. The goal is not merely to define the Madness of King Donald, but to warn the public where it will inevitably lead.


Ex-Trump executive: I knew he was ill for last 35 years, "Narcissism impairs his ability to see reality," said Dr. Julie Futrell, a clinical psychologist, who, of course, added a standard disclaimer because she has never actually treated Trump. "So you can't use logic to persuade someone like that. Three million women marching? Doesn't move him. Advisers point out that a policy choice didn't work? He won't care. The maintenance of self-identity is the organizing principle of life for those who fall toward the pathological end of the narcissistic spectrum."


Daily News - Click here for full article

'Malignant narcisissm':

 Donald Trump displays classic traits of mental illness, claim psychologists.


Click on headline for full article

Narcissism

Noun


1.  Inordinate fascination with oneself; excessive     self-love; vanity.  Synonyms: self-centeredness,     smugness, egocentrism.


2.  Psychoanalysis. erotic gratification derived from     admiration of one's own physical or mental     attributes, being a normal condition at the     infantile level of personality development.

Trump’s Lies vs.

Your Brain

By Maria Konnikova - January/February 2017

All presidents lie. Richard Nixon said he was not a crook, yet he orchestrated the most shamelessly crooked act in the modern presidency. Ronald Reagan said he wasn’t aware of the Iran-Contra deal; there’s evidence he was. Bill Clinton said he did not have sex with that woman; he did, or close enough. Lying in politics transcends political party and era. It is, in some ways, an inherent part of the profession of politicking.

But Donald Trump is in a different category. The sheer frequency, spontaneity and seeming irrelevance of his lies have no precedent. Nixon, Reagan and Clinton were protecting their reputations; Trump seems to lie for the pure joy of it. A whopping 70 percent of Trump’s statements that PolitiFact checked during the campaign were false, while only 4 percent were completely true, and 11 percent mostly true. (Compare that to the politician Trump dubbed “crooked,” Hillary Clinton: Just 26 percent of her statements were deemed false.)

Those who have followed Trump’s career say his lying isn’t just a tactic, but an ingrained habit. New York tabloid writers who covered Trump as a mogul on the rise in the 1980s and ’90s found him categorically different from the other self-promoting celebrities in just how often, and pointlessly, he would lie to them. In his own autobiography, Trump used the phrase “truthful hyperbole,” a term coined by his ghostwriter referring to the flagrant truth-stretching that Trump employed, over and over, to help close sales. Trump apparently loved the wording, and went on to adopt it as his own.

Political Magazine - Click here for the full article.

The First 100 Lies: The Trump Team’s Flurry Of Falsehoods:

The president and his aides succeeded in reaching the mark in just 36 days.  Click on heading for article.

Theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking

on Donald J. Trump

LONDON (The Borowitz Report) – The theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking angered supporters of Donald J. Trump on Monday by responding to a question about the billionaire with a baffling array of long words.



Speaking to a television interviewer in London, Hawking called Trump “a demagogue who seems to appeal to the lowest common denominator,” a statement that many Trump supporters believed was intentionally designed to confuse them.

Moments after Hawking made the remark, Google reported a sharp increase in searches for the terms “demagogue,” denominator,” and “Stephen Hawking.”

“For a so-called genius, this was an epic fail,” Trump’s campaign manager, Corey Lewadowski, said.  If Professor Hawking wants to do some damage, maybe he should try talking in English next time.”

Later in the day, Hawking attempted to clarify his remarks about the presumptive Republican Presidential nominee, telling a reporter, Trump bad man.  Real bad man.”


Demagogue

1.  A leader who makes use of popular prejudices      and false claims and promises in order to gain       power.

2.  A demagogue, in the strict signification of the      word, is a 'leader of the rabble'.

Campaign Promises


Here are 282 of Donald Trump's campaign promises. In Donald Trump's final days on the campaign trail, he promised his supporters that “every dream you ever dreamed for your country” will come true if he becomes president — one of dozens of sweeping promises he made and is now expected to fulfill. Nov 28, 2016


The Washington Post - Click here for full article